Flooding rivers are dangerous, deep for spring kayakers all over Iowa

Recent heavy rains are making some central Iowa rivers dangerous for canoes and kayaks. The Iowa Department of Natural Resources has a warning for people heading to rivers. “Everyone wants to get out. They’ve been locked up all winter,” said Todd Robertson, DNR security expert. Robertson said the unusually warm spring weather is bringing out anxious paddlers and kayakers – many of whom he said are inexperienced. He is issuing several warnings. First, many rivers are deeper than normal. They move faster than normal and are cold. “You’ll say, ‘Wow, that water is still very cold’ and it is. It just hasn’t had time to warm up yet,” Robertson said. He said one of the most dangerous areas is called a filter. It is a natural area where the strong current collects and traps logs and other debris. Current can also send jet skis into that debris, flip boats, and push boaters underwater. “People can get sucked into those very easily. Those can be killers. So, our main advice is to wear a life jacket but avoid those piles of wood on the river,” Robertson said. You can go to the DNR website under the “Things to do” tab. There you can find information on the safety of river boats and see which rivers are closed due to the construction of bridges. More from Todd Magel:

Recent heavy rains are making some central Iowa rivers dangerous for canoes and kayaks. The Iowa Department of Natural Resources has a warning for people heading to rivers.

“Everyone wants to go out. They’ve been locked up all winter, “said Todd Robertson, DNR security expert.

Robertson said the unusually warm spring weather is bringing out anxious paddlers and kayakers – many of those he said are inexperienced.

It is issuing several warnings.

First, many rivers are deeper than normal. They move faster than normal and are cold.

“You’re going to say, ‘Wow, that water is still very cold,’ and it is. It just hasn’t had time to warm up yet,” Robertson said.

He said one of the most dangerous areas is called a filter. It is a natural area where the strong current collects and traps logs and other debris.

Current can also send jet skis into that debris, flip boats, and push boaters underwater.

“People can get sucked into those things very easily. Those can be killers. So, our main advice is to wear a life jacket but avoid those piles of wood on the river, ”Robertson said.

You can go to the DNR website to the “Things to do” tab. There you can find information on the safety of river boats and see which rivers are closed due to the construction of bridges.

More from Todd Magel: